Pious Faults: Old Thread 12"

Pious Faults: Old Thread 12"


Tags: · 10s · australia · hardcore · recommended · weird
Regular price
Sold out
Sale price
$14.50

Now is the time to take notice of Brisbane, Australia's PIOUS FAULTS. Aside from a short, yet exciting demo on the Tenth Court label and a brief feature in the almighty Distort Mag, Pious Faults have remained somewhat of an enigma since their inception in late 2016. However, with "Old Thread", the young Australian group have crafted a remarkably lucid and original vinyl debut. A sonic whirlwind of wonderfully deconstructed hardcore punk - songs stripped of inheritable form; leaping from stone to leaf to puddle in a unique, abstract manner. A sound far from imitation but comparable to early Saccharine Trust, Spike In Vain, or more recent fare like Dry Rot and NASA Space Universe. Pious Faults careen through nine tracks on this 45rpm 12", balancing short, disaffected hardcore punk blasts with an experimental urgency, as referenced across tracks like the massive "Worship the Surface". The tense physical interplay between instruments feeds powerfully beneath uninhibited, wonder-full snarls that depict a landscape of the destructive external and a keyhole view into the bruised internal. Experience is exposed here by Pious Faults. Watch on and see no mind tied to its own leap. This record is born solely out of love, amusement & all the motions that follow in their wake. Reconnect with what allows you. Want on. Packaged in a full color jacket printed on textured, recycled stock with risograph booklets printed by Oddities Prints and digital download. Limited to 400.

Our take: Debut vinyl from this Australian band doing the “hardcore as art” thing. The label’s description mentions Saccharine Trust and Spike in Vain, and while I don't doubt there’s plenty of wear on the members’ copies of Paganicons and Disease Is Relative, the comparison I can’t get around when I listen to this LP is Born Against. Pious Faults’ squirrelly, off-kilter rhythms, dissonant chords, ultra-compressed song structures, bright, clear, and powerful production, and defiant refusal to rock are all qualities I associate with Nine Patriotic Hymns for Children. I love hardcore, I love art, and I love artsy hardcore (the records I’ve mentioned so far in this description are among my all-time favorites), so I’m right in the target demographic for this record, and indeed I like it a lot. However, I also realize that it’s a different kind of listening than most hardcore records. This isn’t a record you throw on at a party and scream along with as you slam beers. Instead, it’s a record you put on alone, in the dark, letting its mutated rhythms crawl through your body like anxious parasites. It’s not an immediate record, and I would argue that, in order to appreciate it, you need to know a lot about hardcore so you have a clear idea of what this is not. Or, perhaps if you fell in love with prog’s jagged rhythms or free jazz's dissonant harmonies before you heard Minor Threat or Agnostic Front this will speak to you. At any rate, this is smart, weird music for smart, weird people.