Patti: Bad Back 7"

Patti: Bad Back 7"


Tags: · 10s · bay area · egg punk · punk · recommended · weird
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Patti – punk mom's name AND the name of your new favorite new band. Immediately catchy coneheads-core punk goofy enough to disguise what the members of Patti truly are: shredders. Because it jumps, has a sense of urgency and more than a little humor.

PATTI are three people from Oakland, California who write rambunctious dance music with a post punk tool kit and an insightful yet short attention span. Their songs typically clock in around two minutes long and are a wild head-rush and another addition to our "DEVO-CORE" rooster here at ETT. (Ok, our "egg punk" rooster.)

The EP has the same tightly wound, Devo-esque energy and razor sharp songwriting as their tapes before. There are a lot of great moments on this EP that only come around once, and you just have to listen to the record again if you want to hear it again, which I must admit is hardly a chore. This is the type of band that makes you angry they're so good.

Bouncing between dissonant punk, inept proto hardcore and psycho noise-pop whilst dealing with issues as relevant as having fun, what a debut EP. Grab this one now before it becomes another one of those things with shocking Discogs price tags. 



Our take: Debut EP from this band out of Oakland, though I'd forgive you for thinking they’re from Minneapolis as they sound strikingly similar to Uranium Club. Rhythmically, Patti have more of a Minutemen / Suburban Lawns-type white funk swing to them, but the deadpan vocals and Krautrock-ish way of riding simple, repetitive riffs will do any Uranium Club fan right. The bass lines, guitar lines, and vocal patterns are uniformly interesting, but one place Patti excel is in writing cool bridge parts. Most of the songs on Bad Back have a middle section about 3/4 of the way through where the song goes to some strange, unexpected place. The transitions are fluid, so you find yourself thinking, “wait, is this the same song?” until they drop back into one of the familiar parts from earlier in the song. Having that sense of movement and development to the song takes what would have been an interesting collection of riffs and makes them into something more than that, a set of musical stories that unfold in front of you. This is top-notch egg punk, so even if you only mess with the hits like Uranium Club and Coneheads this is worth checking out.