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Regular price
$24.00

Carcass: Necroticism: Descanting the Insalubrious 12" (new)

Earache Records
Regular price
$24.00

Carcass: Necroticism: Descanting the Insalubrious 12" (new)

Earache Records
Carcass: Necroticism: Descanting the Insalubrious 12
Now, Carcass' legendary breakthrough third album, Necroticism: Decanting The Insalubrious, which many of you have been waiting years to own is finally back in print on vinyl. This is expansive gore with mammoth production from Colin Richardson (Slipknot, Cannibal Corpse, Behemoth) to boot. The unnerving medical lyrics are still prevalent but a much more precise musical approach is in evidence here as well thanks to the addition of guitarist Michael Amott (Arch Enemy) who makes his Caracass debut.

Our take: Earache's revolving door reissue game lands back on Carcass's third LP, bringing the classic Necroticism LP back into print for the first time in a few years. This is probably the one album that every Carcass fan can get behind... while the band evolved considerably over their original tenure, Necroticism is the only record that retains traces of all of the various styles they plied. Admittedly, you can tell that the band were pretty much over grindcore by this point, but there are some blastbeats and gutteral vocals here and there (well, at least on the first track, "Inpropagation"). However, while they were moving away from those standard grindcore tropes, the songs are still built around the whiplash rhythmic changes of grindcore, only this time rather than simply jerking back and forth between fast and slow parts Carcass have a whole wide pallet of sounds at their disposal. You can definitely hear the melodic death metal sound that they would perfect on Heartwork developing, but it's really just that the riffs themselves are catchy and melodic... I don't know if it's that they hadn't figured out how to write a death metal pop song yet or if they were just more interested in the grind-inspired schizophrenic song structures, but Necroticism's eclectic, at times almost Beefheart-ian approach to songwriting and arrangement seems to lay the template for entire subgenres of modern metal and metalcore. All of this rather academic contextualization aside, at its core Necroticism is just a straight up riff monster with absolutely perfect crunchy production... if you only own half a dozen metal albums this should probably be one of them.