Behavior: 375 Images of Angels 12"

Iron Lung Records

$20.00

John Cage related this anecdote: “One evening I was walking along Hollywood Boulevard, nothing much to do. I stopped and looked in the window of a stationary shop. A mechanized pen was suspended in space in such a way that, as a mechanized roll of paper passed by it, the pen went through the motions of the same penmanship exercises I had learned as a child in the third grade. Centrally placed in the window was an advertisement explaining the mechanical reasons for the perfection of the operation of the suspended mechanical pen. I was fascinated, for everything was going wrong. The pen was tearing the paper to shreds and splattering ink all over the window and on the advertisement, which, nevertheless, remained legible.” This little musing somehow rhymes with the spirit of BEHAVIOR’s '375 Images of Angels,' unique “musical” approach to punk. The very essence of punk is a contemptuous “fuck you” to convention anyway, or at least a troubled groping for new avenues of self creation. There is a simple beauty in deconstruction, in calculated naivety, in messes, in processes and in the plain night air of Los Angeles. '…Angels' dances like a dog shaking off a swim. '...Angels' is as deliberate as it is free. Don’t we all want this dichotomy in our lives? The drive to make our time our own and the permission to chase joy?

Our take: Man, I still don't know what to make of Iron Lung's description of this record... I've re-read it a bunch of times and I just can't figure out what they're trying to get across. I guess that the John Cage reference and the minimalistic artwork had me thinking this was going to be more along the lines of Pig Heart Transplant or some of Iron Lung's other more "experimental" releases, but this is actually punk. I mean, it's noisy, rather askew and totally unique punk music, but as far as I can tell the music is made primarily with guitar, bass, drums, and vocals, and tends to proceed at a rather loud volume and high energy level. That said, this does have a very artsy--some might even say pretentious--vibe. It reminds me quite a bit of the overall vibe of the early releases by Iceage and Lower... like those bands, Behavior seem to aspire to a kind of Birthday Party-esque, art-school-meets-the-Stooges aesthetic, but there's still some straightforward hardcore lurking around in there, even if the band themselves are trying to suppress it. The presentation and execution are pretty much spot-on, so if you can get down with a little pretension in your punk this is well worth a look.
Tags: 10s melodic noisy post-punk