Anarquia Vertical: S/T 12"

Anarquia Vertical: S/T 12"


Tags: · 10s · hardcore · punk · recommended · spain · ushc
Regular price
$15.00
Sale price
$15.00

ANARQUÍA VERTICAL’s Sistema Total de Liberación aims to be the handbook of the ultranihilist revolution to come: think about Eskorbuto’s “anti-todo” motto becoming not just an slogan but a full gospel in the hands of five suited-up punks. The A-side contains 10 tracks of raw 80’s hardcore in the vein of Spanish and Italian traditions; think about Anti-Dogmatikss and Eskoria-Tza in one hand and Indigesti, Negazione or CCM in the other, plus some NYHC circa ‘82 like The Mad, Kraut and Heart Attack, some Deep Wound and tons of Void. The B-side contains a remix of all the tracks of the A-side in the form of a couple of dark electronic tracks courtesy of Hagal, of Destino Final's fame.

Sistema Total de Liberación comes housed in a sleeve designed by the last great living artist, Oriol Roca who manages to capture the contents of the record flawlessly with a full colour sleeve and insert. Includes download code.


Our take: The La Vida Es un Mus label is pretty much an embarrassment of riches, whether you’re talking about the pop hooks of Rata Negra or Primetime, the catchy oi! of Rixe, the bludgeoning hardcore of Kriegshog or S.H.I.T., or the punked-out sounds of Exotica or La Misma. However, whenever LVEUM releases one of their left-of-center hardcore bands I always take notice. Like Iron Lung Records (with whom LVEUM have a lot of overlap in terms of roster), Paco at LVEUM has a real ear for this kind of avant-hardcore, and Anarquia Vertical certainly fit that mold, insofar as there is a mold for this kind of sound at all. While most people not actively involved in the scene write off modern hardcore as a retread of a retread, there are tons of bands out there trying to make hardcore that you’ve never heard before, and this is one of the bands that is really succeeding. I’d say that the foundation of Anarquia Vertical’s sound is in the loose and while expressionist hardcore of Wretched, though they’re not really as noisy or as crusty. However, there’s the same sense of wild abandon and nearly-falling-apart-ness in their music that makes me love Wretched to the core of my very soul. Though, really, I suppose you could substitute any number of loose and wild hardcore bands into the comparison above—Void, Genetic Control, early Tar Babies—and it would have pretty much the same point. And then there’s the b-side of the record, which consists of remixes of the a-side tracks wherein they are deconstructed and twisted inside out into seething, gurgling power electronics tracks. Sistema Total De Liberación isn’t going to make the kids mosh or point their fingers at the lead singer, but it also deserves a place in your collection because there isn’t anything else out there that sounds precisely like it.