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Home Front: Think of The Lie 12"

Home Front: Think of The Lie 12"


Tags: · 20s · Canada · hcpmf · melodic · new wave · post-punk · synth
Regular price
$22.00
Sale price
$22.00

Created on the western edges of the infinite plains and prairies of coldest Canada, Edmonton, Alberta’s HOME FRONT dance freely and madly along the edges of time and create their own moment amongst the revered and long frozen reserves of THE CURE, SUICIDE, ECHO AND THE BUNNYMEN, “Second Empire Justice” era BLITZ, and NEW ORDER. A record bubbling over with analog synth, guitar loops, slammed 808 drums, and anthemic vocal pushes tugging at the great moment in-between the “death” of punk and the “birth” of new wave, pulling fresh sounds into their punk roots and shoving a studded leather jacket around a silk robe. Justice, violence, doubt and uncertainty a la Gary Numan narrating a Warren Miller Extreme Ski Special on the set of TO LIVE AND DIE IN LA: this is HOME FRONT.

Recorded by HOME FRONT in an unheated plywood box in some semblance of fading daylight.
Produced and mixed in the darkest depths of lockdown by Jonah Falco on a boat moored outside an isolated estate along the A40 in between sets of “The Evil Russian Pushup Challenge” and icy walks to Lidl.


Our take: Now with close to 250 releases under their belt, our friends at La Vida Es Un Mus continue to deliver consistently fantastic releases in the world of punk. But for every Disclose reissue or new, crushing hardcore band out of Spain, we receive an occasional dose of melody. Think Of The Lie, the debut release from Canadian group Home Front, craftily synthesizes some of the most notable and familiar sounds of 80s UK indie pop and post-punk. The first track, “Flaw In The Design,” brings New Order to mind with its era-accurate sounds and production, coupled with the group’s intelligent songwriting and arrangements. Lush, sweeping synthesizers and chorus-laden guitars top warm and pounding 808 drum machines. The singer has a voice not unlike Robert Smith, simultaneously wavering and passionate. La Vida likens the group to Second Empire Justice-era Blitz, which is a dead ringer comparison to describe punkers who have taken the plunge into this sonic territory. In more recent years, many punk groups have reached into the deep reservoir of new wave history to find a blueprint for their band, but the end product can seem dull or contrived. And while Home Front wears their influences on their dayglo ascots, the songs are so tastefully executed and rich with conviction that you can’t fault them. Home Front unashamedly shies away from edge, and instead commits to crafting a full-on pop record that feels both nostalgic and fresh.