Final Conflict: 1985 Demo cassette

Final Conflict: 1985 Demo cassette


Tags: · 80s · california · crossover · D-beat · hardcore · hcpmf · reissues
Regular price
$14.00
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$14.00

In the history of Southern California Hardcore Punk, the demo tape recorded by Final Conflict in 1985 is considered an important artifact. Heavily inspired by the UK’s Discharge as well as their neighbors from the northern part of the state Crucifix, the band produced a cassette containing the kind of blazing riffs and politically charged lyrics many punks thought was over and done after being abandoned by the previous, spiky-haired generation. Although the band is most well-known for their crushing debut LP on the Pusmort label from 1987 "Ashes To Ashes" as well as the equally lethal releases that would follow, it was the wild spirit and rage contained on the demo tape that initially gained the attention of those truly committed to the 'core.
No Idols is proud to present the Final Conflict demo from 1985 in its original cassette format accompanied by all its original artwork and lyric sheet. Made in a limited edition of 300 copies, this fifteen-song cassette comes in a numbered, rubber-stamped manilla envelope accompanied by half-sized reproductions of three classic Final Conflict flyers.

Our take: Final Conflict’s 1985 demo cassette is back in print on its original format (albeit with expanded packaging) on No Idols Records. Longtime fans of Final Conflict (of which I am one) will already be familiar with this material, as it’s been reissued many times already, both as bonus tracks appended to FC’s seminal first album Ashes to Ashes, and as a stand-alone release by 540 Records in 2013. While that might seem like overkill for a demo, particularly since most of the songs were rerecorded for Ashes to Ashes, this tape is a seminal document. Without the crunchier, cleaner, and more metallic production of Ashes to Ashes, classic tracks like “Apocalypse Now,” “One Answer,” and “What Kind of Future” burn with a different energy, placing more emphasis on Ron Martinez’s catchy vocals and giving the entire affair more of a peace punk feel. Even as someone who loves Ashes to Ashes, I feel strongly that both the demo and the album are essential. Besides strong sound (there are some crummy rips of this tape out there), it’s cool to see the tape in its iconic original packaging. No Idols has also placed the tape and j-card in a hand-stamped manilla envelope that also contains reproductions of flyers and the original lyric sheet. If you’ve already bought these songs one time (or even more) that might not be enough to sell you, but there’s no denying this is a cool package that feels like a love letter to this seminal recording.