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Riot .303: S/T 12"

Riot .303: S/T 12"


Tags: · 80s · Canada · hcpmf · punk · reissues
Regular price
$30.00
Sale price
$30.00

NOTE: We have copies on both blue and green vinyl. Colors selected at random for orders.

Canadian Prairie Punk! Early 80s greats RIOT .303 from Calgary featuring ex-Sturgeons rhythm section and future Beyond Possession vocalist. 17 punk rock anthems recorded 1981-83, including their full studio output — four each from 1982’s super-rare Crowd Control EP and Thrasher’s Skate Rock Vol. 1, plus 9 powerful unreleased songs. Meticulously remastered by Audu Obaje. 8-page booklet with photos, art, and full-band interview. Two stickers. 550 copies, colored vinyl.



Our take: Supreme Echo Records reissues the recorded works by this punk band from Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Despite being, from what I can tell, a small and isolated city on the Canadian prairie, the city was an unlikely hardcore hotbed. Any rabid consumer of punk books and documentaries will recognize the name of the Calgarian, a hotel dive bar in the city that hosted a ton of great hardcore and punk shows in the 80s. Riot .303 played there often (as the flyers in the booklet attest), but they weren’t exactly a hardcore band. Riot .303 was one of those North American bands who took a lot of influence from 70s UK punk. The Canadian Subhumans come up again and again in the liner notes, and with good reason… Riot .303 is a dead ringer for them at points, but even if you aren’t that familiar with the Canadian Subhumans, Riot .303 will be up your alley if you like bands like Toxic Reasons, the Suicide Commandos, or D.O.A. This LP contains the band’s highly collectible 4-track 1982 EP, Crowd Control (probably their best stuff), their four tracks from the Thrasher Skate Rock cassette, and a bunch of rehearsal recordings. According to the liner notes, a contributing factor to Riot .303’s breakup was some members’ disinterest in conforming to hardcore’s ever-faster tempos, but the irony is that it’s the most hardcore moments that stick with me here. Riot .303 was great at writing sing-along choruses, and tracks like “Drugs” and “Organized Religion” that have a memorable chorus hook and a fiery delivery are top-notch. The energy level is highest on the rehearsal tracks, but the fidelity isn’t the best. I get the impression that if the stars had aligned differently, Riot .303 could have produced something as powerful as Subhumans classics like “Fuck You” or “Death to the Sickoids,” but even if they don’t reach that (rather high) bar, I’m still very glad to hear these tracks, particularly when Supreme Echo’s excellent packaging gives the kind of context that deepens one’s appreciation.