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Uranium Club: Two Things At Once (Again) 7"

Uranium Club: Two Things At Once (Again) 7"


Tags: · 20s · hcpmf · indie · minneapolis · post-punk · punk
Regular price
$8.00
Sale price
$8.00

"Two Things at Once (Again)" from Uranium Club is a re-tooled version of the limited 7" available only by subscription as part of the 2019 Sub Pop Singles Club. Side A is part one, a tension-and-release punk number about children dying after swallowing educational toys. Who's to blame? Not us. Part two on the B-side is an instrumental orchestrated with layers of cosmic organ and TWO (!?) kinds of saxophone. The visuals on this one take the form of text covering the sleeve inside and outside (plus a postscript on the center label). Part Italo Calvino, part Sol Lewitt, part Lao Tzu, parts one and two (again) of "Two Things at Once (Again)" from the Minneapolis Uranium Club Band.

Our take: Is there another band anything like Uranium Club? During a time when so many bands reiterate the same idea (and often that idea isn’t even their own), Uranium Club seems like the embodiment of idiosyncrasy and originality. Whether you love or hate their records, you must admit the band is on their own trip, and that continues with this latest single. Two Things at Once (Again) is billed as “retooled” or “reimagined” version of Uranium Club’s contribution to the Sub Pop singles club in 2019, but not being part of said club, I’m not able to go into detail about the differences between the two records. The a-side track has vocals and sounds of a piece with Uranium Club’s previous material, while the b-side is an instrumental that goes off in a spacey direction that sounds like Uranium Club meets Miles Davis’s 70s fusion records. It’s not unprecedented for Uranium Club, but not what I think of as their signature style. I love it, possibly even more than the a-side. The packaging, though, is where you can dive down the rabbit hole. As you can see from the product photo, the layout is heavy on text. It’s written in the second person, parts of it like instructions, but the logic dissolves more or less immediately. If you surrender your rational impulse and follow the text where it leads, it brings you into a similar headspace as Uranium Club’s music (particularly the more spread-out music on their full-lengths), but in a totally different way. Many people—punks especially—won’t enjoy being confounded in this way, but I find Uranium Club’s labyrinthine, Pynchon-esque aesthetic irresistible.