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Malevolence: Apparitions 12"

Malevolence: Apparitions 12"


Tags: · 90s · Canada · hcpmf · metal · reissues · thrash metal
Regular price
$27.00
Sale price
$27.00

Classic Canadian thrash metal from 1992. For a full decade, Malevolence from Victoria, BC held their fists high amidst Western Canada’s metal scene with their distinct brand of Bay Area-influenced thrash. “Apparitions” comprises their full 9-song session recorded by Len Osanic in 1992 at the legendary Fiasco Bros. studio and originally issued as two high-quality, cassette-only demos. Remastered from original analog reels by Brad Boatright at Audiosiege. 12-page full-color booklet with photos, art, and bio. On vinyl for the first time. 500 copies.


Our take: Between this and the Eve of Darkness book I wrote about last week, I’ve been immersed in Canadian metal for the past couple of weeks and, I must say, I’m not mad about it. While Eve of Darkness focused on Toronto-area metal from the 80s, Malevolence was from the west coast (Victoria, BC) and was mostly active during the 90s. The material collected on Apparitions originally came out as two cassette-only releases in 1992. While these releases are referred to as “demos,” they’re very well recorded and polished, standing toe to toe with the highest-profile thrash releases of the late 80s. The material on Malevolence was recorded during one session, with the two cassettes devoted to the band’s newest material (Apparitions) and re-recordings of songs from the previous lineup (Race to Infinity).I’d describe all the tracks here as heavy thrash with a technical bent. They remind me of Forbidden in that Malevolence’s technical proficiency set them apart from the thrashing masses, yet they keep the focus on speed and heaviness and never descend into prog (an accusation you could level at some technical thrash bands). Malevolence could have lit up the world if these recordings came out in 1986 or maybe even 1988, but when I listen to Apparitions with my 1992 ears, it’s easy to see why Malevolence didn’t gain more traction. By 1992 (a year after Nevermind came out), thrash was in its death throes as a genre, and beyond that, the public’s taste in rock music was trending toward the more visceral, even primitive… the more commercial end of metal got consumed by grunge, while the extreme end of metal moved toward death and black metal. Removing my 1992 ears, though, in 2021, Apparitions is just a ripping, accomplished album that anyone into that late 80s thrash sound will enjoy. Further, like their recent Neos reissue, Supreme Echo rounds out the cool artwork with an LP-sized, full-color booklet where drummer Loran Werrun tells the story behind these sessions, the picture rounded out with heaps of photos and flyers.