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Flying Luttenbachers: Shattered Dimension 12"

Flying Luttenbachers: Shattered Dimension 12"


Tags: · 10s · black metal · free jazz · new york · spo-default · spo-disabled · weird
Vendor
God Records
Regular price
$33.00
Sale price
$33.00

After more than ten years, The Flying Luttenbachers are back. The Flying Luttenbachers' Shattered Dimension is the first offering by the seminal cult band since 2007. The current New York City based version of the group on this recording features stalwart leader and primary composer Weasel Walter on drums, saxophonist Matt Nelson (GRID, Elder Ones), bass guitarist Tim Dahl (Child Abuse, Lydia Lunch), and guitarist Brandon Seabrook. During The Flying Luttenbachers' prolific initial 1991 to 2007 sprint, the ever-morphing ensemble explored and challenged the parameters of aggression, dissonance, freedom, hyper-structure, and speed across many idioms ranging from hyperactive free jazz/improvisation, blistering no wave/extreme metal noise infused rock, and ambitiously composed brutal prog. Shattered Dimension was recorded one afternoon in November 2018 at Seizures Palace (better known as Martin Bisi's legendary B.C. Studios to some) with engineer Jason LaFarge. The album opens with a succinct bang in the form of the chaotic blast beat-plus-melody structural form "Goosesteppin'". After the unison melodic statement, the foursome rampages full-speed ahead through the changes, evoking the whiskey-and-cocaine drenched early era mayhem of improv superĀ­group Last Exit. Four frantic minutes later, the Luttenbachers rein things back a bit, with the extended harmolodic group improvisation of "Cripple Walk". The third composition on the record is the stately, ominous "Epitaph", 13 unlucky minutes of monolithic repetition, overlaid with frantic, destructive free playing in an episodic narrative. "Sleaze Factor" offers a bit of relief in the form of a prominent groove, another harmolodic venture, again influenced overtly by the jazz output of Ornette Coleman's Prime Time, Columbia Records' era Arthur Blythe, and the early James Blood Ulmer records. The final cut on this album is the 23-minute long form called "Mutation". It is a succession of abstract blocks highlighting specific sonic activity, organized as a surreal journey through immorally uplifting atonality and repetition. Gatefold sleeve.